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 Table of Contents  
BOOK REVIEW
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 117-118

Local health traditions (LHTs), oral health traditions (OHTs), and ethno-medicinal practices (EMPs): Methodical approach and critical appraisal to establish novelty and uniqueness


1 Department of Ayurveda, Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic Sciences (CCRAS), Ministry of Ayush, Govt. of India, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Botany, Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic Sciences (CCRAS), Ministry of Ayush, Govt. of India, New Delhi, India

Date of Submission21-Dec-2021
Date of Acceptance23-Dec-2021
Date of Web Publication19-Jan-2022

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Amit Kumar Rai
Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic Sciences (CCRAS), Ministry of Ayush, Govt. of India, 61–65, Institutional Area, Opposite D-Block, Janakpuri, New Delhi 110058.
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jdras.jdras_82_21

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How to cite this article:
Rai AK, Shiddamallayya N. Local health traditions (LHTs), oral health traditions (OHTs), and ethno-medicinal practices (EMPs): Methodical approach and critical appraisal to establish novelty and uniqueness. J Drug Res Ayurvedic Sci 2021;6:117-8

How to cite this URL:
Rai AK, Shiddamallayya N. Local health traditions (LHTs), oral health traditions (OHTs), and ethno-medicinal practices (EMPs): Methodical approach and critical appraisal to establish novelty and uniqueness. J Drug Res Ayurvedic Sci [serial online] 2021 [cited 2022 May 28];6:117-8. Available from: http://www.jdrasccras.com/text.asp?2021/6/2/117/336036



The publication titled Local Health Traditions (LHTs), Oral Health Traditions (OHTs), and Ethno-Medicinal Practices (EMPs): Methodical Approach and Critical Appraisal to Establish Novelty and Uniqueness is an account of local health traditions (LHTs) documented by the Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic Sciences (CCRAS) during the year 2007–2018 under Tribal Health Care Research Program (THCRP). It discusses LHT practices pertaining to 348 plant species documented through field surveys in 58 districts of 19 states/territories of different agroclimatic zones across India by 16 CCRAS institutes under THCRP and validation of LHTs based on classical Ayush literature.

The book is mainly divided into two chapters. Chapter 1 provides the introduction about the documentation of LHTs, oral health traditions (OHTs), and ethnomedicinal practices (EMPs) focusing on the background, objective(s), methods (details of study area), and data analysis (informant consensus factor and validation score of LHTs). Chapter 2 is dedicated to the documentation and validation of LHTs based on indigenous medicinal plants under the heads such as Sanskrit name, habit and distribution, therapeutic uses, ethnomedicinal uses reported in the study, other ethnomedicinal uses reported in the literature, and conservation status. A complete list of references cited in the publication has been provided under different sections based on validation criteria, that is, indices of regional/other names, family, drug, use report, and Sanskrit name. Format for the documentation of LHTs/OHTs/EMPs and claim proforma (for submission of details by claimant/healer) are also provided as annexure.

In this book, the plant species are listed by Latin binomial nomenclature in alphabetical order. The accepted name of the plant species and their family has been mentioned as per The Plant List (http://www.theplantlist.org/). In case of change of name, the obsolete names are given as synonyms. The Sanskrit name of plant species is given as per the Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India and classical texts of Ayurveda. The habit and distribution of each species in India is also provided. Plant species used in different Ayush systems such as Ayurveda , Unani, Siddha, Homoeopathy, Sowa Rigpa, and Folk medicine are also given. The action and therapeutic uses of the plant species mentioned in different volumes of Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India (1990, 1999, 2001, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2011, and 2016) is provided. Wherever required, the action and therapeutic uses mentioned in two volumes of Siddha Pharmacopoeia of India (2008 and 2011) and six volumes of Unani Pharmacopoeia of India (2007a–d, 2008, and 2009) are also provided. For the plant species that are not listed in the above Pharmacopoeias, therapeutic uses are cited from Samhita (Ayurveda classical texts)/Nighantu (Ayurveda Materia Medica) and other contemporary works. In the case of non-codified drugs of Ayurveda, action/therapeutic uses mentioned in the relevant literature of respective systems, such as Unani, Siddha, Homoeopathy, and Sowa Rigpa, are given.

The methods of administering these LHT remedies are accompanied by notes on the methods of processing the medicinal plants as fresh juice, decoction, fine herbal paste, and powder, which makes the book user-friendly. Assamese, Bengali, Hindi, Kannada, Marathi, Odia, Tamil, Telugu, and Sanskrit names of the plant species used, along with good quality color photographs, have enhanced the use of this publication.


  Salient Features of the Book Top


  • Validation of LHTs based on classical Ayush literature is first of its kind and not found in other works of ethnomedicinal literature.


  • Validation of LHTs through a methodical approach to establish their novelty and uniqueness.


  • The authors have made all efforts to provide relevant citations for codified drugs given in available classical literature of Ayurveda/Ayush systems.


  • Other ethnomedicinal uses of each plant species collected through systematic search from electronic databases such as PubMed, National Institute of Science Communication and Information Resources (NISCAIR) Online Periodical Repository (NOPR), Google Scholar, and AYUSH Research Portal (ARP), and published books/monographs are also described. This information provides an overall understanding of use of plant species by different indigenous/ethnic/local communities across India.


  • Conservation status of each species is given as per International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), ENVIS, and other published sources which lay focus on need for conservation.


  • Format for the documentation of LHTs/OHTs/EMPs provided in the document will serve as a ready reference for researchers and academicians working in the field of ethnomedicine.



  •   Way Forward Top


    Several plant species discussed in this publication are the constituents of different Ayurveda, Siddha, and Unani (ASU) compound formulations. Such references may be included in the future edition of the book.

    This publication represents a stride toward reclaiming the traditional wealth of India and using it to treat those who can ill-afford more expensive treatments.

    Financial support and sponsorship

    Nil.

    Conflicts of interest

    There are no conflicts of interest.






     

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